Kelly Finley

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Komen Women, Change Your Heart and Your Policy

Such a schism between Komen and PPFA splits asunder the very body of women all over America.  A woman’s breast health cannot be separated from her reproductive health.  Both organizations were created by women, for women.  As sisters in body, we share the tears and the victories together.  Now we grieve as Komen defies its founding edict – abandoning their sisters in need. 

Don’t mistake Komen’s decision as mere policy.  We, as sisters in body and politics, are under attack.  We must ask, “What forces are at work that could tear two sister organizations apart?  How could any woman paid by Komen turn her back on another?”  Perhaps such a woman has not yet kissed the cheeks of cancer.  She does not know the fear of the word “cancer” said to a mother who has no medical insurance.  She does not know a dying mother’s fear that her daughter will forget her smiling eyes.  Planned Parenthood was a saving grace for such a woman in need. 

I mourn for the women at Komen who caved to such inhumane politics.  I suspect that many at Komen secretly fear their fate as an organization.  I believe that most are good women who want to do the right thing, knowing that they hold the fate of other women in their hands.  Each woman will have to die knowing that she either fought for other women, or sold them out.  My prayers are with my sisters at Komen.  You are going to need them.

As a tomboy’s mom…I love this. A touching story. One teachers approach to preventing gender bullying.

togetherforjacksoncountykids:

“It’s Okay to be Neither,” By Melissa Bollow Tempel

Alie arrived at our 1st-grade classroom wearing a sweatshirt with a hood. I asked her to take off her hood, and she refused. I thought she was just being difficult and ignored it. After breakfast we got in line for art, and I noticed that she still had not removed her hood. When we arrived at the art room, I said: “Allie, I’m not playing. It’s time for art. The rule is no hoods or hats in school.”

She looked up with tears in her eyes and I realized there was something wrong. Her classmates went into the art room and we moved to the art storage area so her classmates wouldn’t hear our conversation. I softened my tone and asked her if she’d like to tell me what was wrong.

“My ponytail,” she cried.

“Can I see?” I asked.

She nodded and pulled down her hood. Allie’s braids had come undone overnight and there hadn’t been time to redo them in the morning, so they had to be put back in a ponytail. It was high up on the back of her head like those of many girls in our class, but I could see that to Allie it just felt wrong. With Allie’s permission, I took the elastic out and re-braided her hair so it could hang down.

“How’s that?” I asked.

She smiled. “Good,” she said and skipped off to join her friends in art.

‘Why Do You Look Like a Boy?’

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thepoliticalnotebook:

Surprising voting results of the day. Mississippi last night rejected Initiative 26, known as the “personhood amendment” that would have defined life as beginning with conception. It failed by vote of 58% to 42%… and based on interviews, there were some anti-abortion voters who still voted against it either because they felt the legislation was vague, strategically poor, or intrusive into what they felt should be a decision between husband and wife.
Above: Demonstrators against Initiative 26 outside a polling center yesterday. Bruce Newman/Oxford Eagle.
Read the stories at the Guardian and the New York Times.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Surprising voting results of the day. Mississippi last night rejected Initiative 26, known as the “personhood amendment” that would have defined life as beginning with conception. It failed by vote of 58% to 42%… and based on interviews, there were some anti-abortion voters who still voted against it either because they felt the legislation was vague, strategically poor, or intrusive into what they felt should be a decision between husband and wife.

Above: Demonstrators against Initiative 26 outside a polling center yesterday. Bruce Newman/Oxford Eagle.

Read the stories at the Guardian and the New York Times.

Hmmmm….I smell sexism, a layer of creamy classism…wait, mixed with a ribbon of heterosexism and lovely after-taste of “oh please!” It’s missing that vital ingredient of the “dad,” but we’re used to that.  Shut up, NBC.  Women aren’t choosing flexibility over big titles in the workplace. The woman says she doesn’t want to work 80 hours a week. That’s choosing sanity opting out of “slavery” not a “big promotion.” And the other woman has herself and a dog to take care. I can’t blame her. I’d be enjoying life, too. Read between the lines of the story and the real title is, “Some women are smart and privileged enough not to be owned by ‘The Man’!”

Ever feel this way about marriage too?!?  How will she ever make it down the altar, to say nothing of surviving the seven-year itch? Poor woman is going to need a helmet. 

So, my daughter saw this on the news as I was getting ready for work. What do you say to a nine year-old when she asks, “Mommy, am I going to have to get that shot?” Really! It’s only 7:15 in the morning.

I don’t know what is worse. Her fear of shots. My fear of Perry. Or having to explain to a nine year-old why she doesn’t (yet) need a shot that is for a sexually transmitted infection. All with only one cup of coffee in my system.

Just another day in running feminist mom defense.  Next!